FAQ’S

FAQ'S

 

Below are some of the most frequently asked questions patients have about dentistry and oral health issues. If you have any other questions, or would like to schedule an appointment, we would love to hear from you. Click on a question below to see the answer.
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Frequently Asked Questions

Your first visit is important to us as it will allow us the chance to address all your dental concerns and present an individualized treatment plan that is best for you.

At your initial visit, your dentist will take all of your personal details, such as your address and date of birth. They will also take a full medical history to make sure that they are fully aware of any illnesses or medication that you may be taking and they can then treat you safely.

The dentist will then carry out a full check-up and chart all of your teeth and previous treatment, they will also assess the condition of your gums and your general oral hygiene. They may also take diagnostic x-rays.

If you need to have any dental treatment, your dentist will discuss this with you. They may give you a treatment plan and tell you what the cost is going to be.

You can make any further appointments as necessary.

There is no one-size-fits-all dental treatment. Some people need to visit the dentist once or twice a year; others may need more visits. You are a unique individual, with a unique smile and unique needs when it comes to keeping your smile healthy.

Yes. Even if you don’t have any symptoms, you can still have dental health problems that only a dentist can diagnose. Regular dental visits will also help prevent problems from developing. Continuity of care is an important part of any health plan and dental health is no exception. Keeping your mouth healthy is an essential piece of your overall health. It’s also important to keep your dentist informed of any changes in your overall health since many medical conditions can affect your dental health too.

Yes, sweets and foods with acid, like candy and soda, could stick to teeth and lead to cavities. Smoking and chewing tobacco can cause oral cancer and gum disease.

While teeth are strong enough to chew ice and tear open packages, this can break them and stress your jaws. Gritting or grinding down on teeth when you’re stressed may crack them.

Biting your nails is another bad habit. It pulls your jaw out of position and changes how your teeth fit together.

Fluoride helps make teeth strong and prevents decay. The American Academy of Pediatrics, the American Dental Association (ADA), and the CDC all agree that kids should use fluoride toothpaste for brushing, taking care not to swallow it.

Adults benefit from using fluoride to protect their teeth, too.

Tooth decay is caused by acids that are produced by bacteria in the presence of sugar. To prevent decay, these bacteria, sugar, and acids must be periodically removed by brushing and flossing.

Cavities break through the surface enamel of teeth, and they’ll probably get bigger unless you close them off with fillings.

A combination of strong materials or a white mix called a composite goes into the cavity soft and then hardens as it dries.

Once set, fillings can last a long time but need replacing if they break or wear down.

Mouthwashes for cavity protection, sensitivity, and fresh breath may help when you use them with regular brushing and flossing — but not instead of daily cleanings. Your dentist can recommend the best type for you.

Some people need twice-daily rinses for gum health or alcohol-free washes for dry mouth.

Kids under 6 shouldn’t use mouthwash to avoid the chance of them swallowing it.

Here are some tips to help you take care of your smile:

  • Healthy habits.  Brushing twice a day  for two minutes and flossing daily are essential for everyone, no matter how unique your mouth is. It’s the best way to fight tooth decay and gum disease.
  • Build a relationship. Continuity of care is an important part of any health plan and dental health is no exception. When your dentist sees you regularly, he or she is in a good position to catch oral problems early. For instance, catching gum disease when it’s still reversible, or cavities when they are small and are more easily treated.
  • Maintain. Keeping your mouth healthy is an essential piece of your overall health. It’s important to keep your dentist informed of any changes in your overall health as well.
  • Talk about it! Only your dentist can determine what the best treatment plan is for you. Have questions about your oral health or certain dental procedures? Start a conversation. Ask your dentist to explain step-by-step. Dentists love having satisfied, healthy patients.

Call our office to obtain emergency contact information in case you experience a dental emergency after hours, over the weekend, or during holidays.

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